Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Overview, Health Benefits, Side effects

Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Overview, Health Benefits, Side effects


Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Overview,


Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) other names: Beaumont Root, Bowman's Root, Culveris Root, Culvers, Culver's Physic, Culver's Root, Hini, Leptandra, Leptandra virginica, Oxadoddy, Physic Root, Purple Leptandra, Racine Noire, Tall Speedwell, Tall Veronica, Veronica virginica, Veronica Virginica Root, Veronicastrum virginicum, VĂ©ronicastre de Virginie, VĂ©ronique de Virginie, Whorlywort.

Black root (Scrophulariaceae) is a hardy perennial herb having thin stem that grows up to seven feet high. The herb bears clusters of three or even more slender spear-shaped leaves that circle the stem at its nodes. Black root produces tiny white, blue or pinkish flowers between June and September. The flowers appear in clusters of spikes, each measuring about 3 to 8 inches in length, at the stem terminals.

Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Overview, Health Benefits, Side effects
Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) plant


Native Indians of North America who found out the therapeutic qualities of the herb used black root in their ceremonies also. The Seneca Indians used this herb for ritual purifications to induce vomiting. For this they drank an herbal tea prepared with the dried out root of the herb. Another Native American tribe, Chippewa, employed the root in the form of a blood sanitizer.

The root of this herb also possesses the aptitude to enhance the bile flow from the liver. In effect, herbalists used the dehydrated black root to treat liver ailments as well as to cure persistent indigestion and other medical conditions that were believed to occur owing to the dysfunction of the liver.

Black root is native to North America and is found growing naturally in pastures and forests across the continent. The root of this herb is dug up in autumn, dried up and stored for a year before use.


Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Health Benefits


Black root is a plant. Black root grows in the US and Canada and has a bitter and nauseating taste. People use the underground stem (rhizome) and the root as medicine.

Even to this day, practitioners of herbal medicine recommend small doses of black root in the form of a purgative and also as a medication to treat gall bladder and liver ailments. This herb is also used to cure bloating and flatulence, and, at the same time alleviates uneasiness caused by rectal prolapse (a medical condition in which the walls of the rectum overhang through the anus) and hemorrhoids. Sometimes, black root is given to cure skin problems in case the functioning of the patient's liver is poor.

Black root is used for ongoing constipation and disorders of the liver and gallbladder. Black root is also used to cause vomiting.

Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Overview, Health Benefits, Side effects
Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) flower


The fresh root of black root is violently laxative and may even be emetic. However, the dried or dehydrated root is gentler and less violent. Leptandrin, a tincture prepared with the root of the herb, mildly stimulates the liver and, at the same time, encourages bile secretion with no irritation of the bowels or purging. In addition, black root also serves as a tonic for the stomach and is effective in treating diarrhea, persistent dysentery, torpidity of the liver (lethargic functioning of the liver) and cholera infantum (a deadly type of gastroenteritis usually occurring in infants).

It may be noted that descriptions regarding the use of black root are sometimes contradictory, possibly because of the disparity in the action of the root in its fresh and dehydrated forms. It seems that taking herbal formulations prepared with the fresh roots of the herb may result in bloody stools and even forcible abortions when taken by pregnant women. However, a decoction prepared with the dried root of black root may perhaps be effective in treating sporadic fevers. It is said that the dehydrated root of the herb has been successfully used in treating leprosy as well as cachetic (common ill health with thinness, generally occurring together with cancer or a unceasing infectious ailment) diseases as well as in conjugation with cream of tartar in treating dropsy (earlier known as edema).

Black root is known to be a useful natural remedy for malaise or anxiety, pain when pressure is applied and chubbiness around the liver. It is also recommended to treat loss of appetite, lethargic functioning of the liver, indolence of the gastrointestinal organs, cold skin and extremities, dull headaches, intense stupor and mental depression. All these symptoms are an indication of the lack of proper functioning of the liver as well as the gastrointestinal tract. Black root helps to strengthen these organs and enhances their functioning. It also fortifies the gastrointestinal tract, improves the actions of the glandular organs and, hence, is recommended for curing all types of indolence or torpidity of the organs mentioned here.

Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Side effects


There isn’t enough information to know if taking black root is safe.

However, there have been reports of stomach pain or cramps, changes in stool color or odor, drowsiness, headache, nausea, and vomiting after taking black root. Large doses have been linked to reports of liver damage.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Black root might be unsafe to take the fresh root by mouth. There is a concern that black root might cause miscarriages and birth defects, but this hasn’t been proven so far. Stay safe and don’t take black root if you are pregnant. It’s also best to avoid black root if you are breast-feeding. Not enough is known about how it might affect the nursing infant.

Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) Overview, Health Benefits, Side effects
Black Root (Leptandra Virginica Syn. Veronicastrum Virginicum) image


Gallbladder problems such as gallstones or a blocked bile duct: Don’t take black root if you have gallbladder problems. Black root might make your condition worse.

Inflammation of the stomach or intestines, such as colitis or Crohn's disease: Black root can irritate the digestive tract, cause vomiting, and act like a laxative. All of these effects might be harmful if you have colitis, Crohn’s disease, or a similar condition. Don’t take black root if you have one of these disorders.

Hemorrhoids: Don’t use black root if you have hemorrhoids. It can act like a laxative and make hemorrhoids more bothersome.

Menstruation: Don’t take black root if you are having your period. It can act like a laxative and add to discomfort.