Benefits Of Trillium (Bethroot) For Health

Benefits Of Trillium (Bethroot) For Health


Trillium (Bethroot)


Trillium (Bethroot) is known as other name: American Ground Lily, Bethroot, Birthroot, Coughroot, Ground Lily, Indian Balm, Indian Shamrock, Jew's-harp Plant, Milk Ipecac, Nodding Wakerobin, Pariswort, Red Trillium, Snakebite, Stinking Benjamin, Three-leaved Nightshade, Trillium, Wake Robin, Trillium erectum, Trillium grandiflorum, Trillium nivale, Trillium recurvatum, Trillium sessile, Trillium undulatum....

Trillium (botanical name Trillium erectum) may be generally known by their 3 verticillate, net-veined leaves, and their solitary, terminal flower, which varies in color in the different species, being white, red, purple, whitish-yellow, or reddish-white; the peduncle will also be found erect in some species, and recurved in others. The roots of these plants are oblong or terete, somewhat tuberous, dark or brownish externally, white internally, from 1 to 5 inches in length, and from 1/2 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter, beset with a few branching fibers laterally.

Benefits Of Trillium (Bethroot) For Health
Trillium (Bethroot) Picture

Trillium is common to the middle and western states, growing in rich soils, in damp, rocky, and shady woods, and flowering in May and June. Nearly all the species of the genus Trillium are medicinal, and possess analogous properties; and among them the most common, and consequently the most frequently collected and employed are those given below, under the heading Related Species.

During the early phase of spring, while nature lovers walking in the woods are likely to be lured to collect the attractive, low-growing trillium. It is true that the appeal of trillium is reverberated in one more of its names, for instance, wake-robin, a cue that this plant is one of the early offerings of the spring. In fact, there is one more reason why the flowers of trillium ought to be left alone - they are visible quite easily owing to their moniker ‘Stinking Benjamin'. A number of herbal experts have discovered that the smell of the plant has a very close resemblance to the disgusting odour of decomposing flesh that they prepare a lotion using the roots and rhizomes of trillium to treat gangrene founded on the formerly-regarded principles of signatures, consistent with the characteristics of a plant are indicates its consequent usefulness for the human body.

The plant's name birthroot explains the primary therapeutic use of trillium and that is to stop bleeding or haemorrhages. Especially, an herbal tea prepared from the roots and rhizome of trillium was given to new mothers to stop haemorrhages following child birth. For the same attributes of the plant, the tea was also recommended for curing uterine problems. The Native Indians in the America applied the herb in the form of lotions and poultices prepared from the crushed leaves to cure skin irritations as well as insect bites.


Benefits Of Trillium (Bethroot) For Health


Trillium's name ‘birthroot' denotes the most popular use of this herb. Traditionally, the indigenous tribes of the America as well as the early European settlers in North America employed trillium to facilitate the labor of child birth. Trillium was also used to cure other problems related to gynecology, including tender nipples, menstrual disorders as well as the uneasiness caused by menopause. Even to this day, trillium continues to be used for easing several of the symptoms mentioned above, in addition to hemorrhages related to uterine fibroids. Contemporary research has demonstrated that the root of trillium encloses steroidal saponins that have hormonal actions on the body. Today, these saponins are being employed while manufacturing medicines for gynecological and obstetric medicine. However, here is a word of caution. Pregnant women should never use this herb, barring under the direct supervision of professional and competent medical practitioners.

In addition, the Native Americans also used trillium internally to cure bowel disorders and applied it topically to ease headaches and to treat sunburns, boils and acne. Chemical analysis of trillium has revealed that this herb encloses tannin, saponin trillin as well as some amount of essential oil.

Benefits Of Trillium (Bethroot) For Health
Trillium (Bethroot) Picture

The trillium roots, fresh or dry, may be boiled in milk and used for diarrhea and dysentery. The raw root is grated and applied as a poultice to the eye in order to reduce swelling, or on aching rheumatic joints. The leaves were boiled in lard and applied to ulcers as a poultice, and to prevent gangrene. A decoction of the root bark can be used as drops in treating earache. Constituents found in the volatile and fixed oils are, tannic acid, saponin, a glucoside resembling convallamarin, sulphuric acid and potassium dichromate, gum, resin, and starch.

Chemical analysis of the trillium root has revealed that it possesses aphrodisiac, astringent, antiseptic, expectorant properties and it is a tonic for the uterus. Trillium is also employed internally for treating an assortment of medical problems related to women, counting bleedings from the urinary tract, uterus and lungs. It is also effective in controlling profuse menstrual flow. Trillium has also proved to be very useful in stopping hemorrhages following child birth (parturition). Trillium is used externally to cure too much vaginal discharge, skin disorders, ulcers (particularly varicose), insect bites and stings and gangrene. An herbal tea prepared from the roots and rhizome of trillium is also effective in treating tender nipples.

The root of trillium is unearthed during the later phase of summer when the herb has shed all its leaves. The rhizome and root of this plant are dried up for use when necessary. The entire herb is employed in the form of a poultice for treating ulcers, tumours as well as inflammations.

Trillium (Bethroot) side effects and cautions


People who are using trillium therapeutically or intend to use it ought to be aware of the side effects caused by this herb. When trillium is taken in high doses it can stimulate menstruation or labor, or it may cause nausea or queasiness. Applying this herb externally may also result in irritation. It is advisable that pregnant women should keep away from using trillium.