Abdominal Pain When Lying Down: Learn Some Induced Causes

Abdominal Pain When Lying Down: Learn Some Induced Causes 


If you have abdominal pain when lying down, you could consider some induced causes here:

Some Causes of Abdominal Pain When Lying Down


GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)


The main symptom of GERD is heartburn, which is a burning pain behind the breastbone that can travel to the back of the throat. The pain can last up to two hours and is often worsened by eating, lying down, or bending over.

Because heartburn and a heart attack have similar symptoms, it is important to note their differences. For someone having a heart attack, burning pain generally travels progressively down the left arm or both arms. For someone with GERD, the burning pain is localized to the upper chest. In addition, exercise may worsen the chest pain for someone having a heart attack (or someone with heart disease), while rest and certain medications may help to relieve it. On the other hand, the burning pain associated with GERD is usually not affected by physical activity. In any case, even people with characteristic features of GERD may require tests to ensure the symptoms are not being caused by a heart attack.

Other symptoms of GERD include regurgitation (swallowed food or liquid going back up into the throat or mouth), a sour or bitter taste in the throat or back of the mouth, excessive saliva, belching, upset stomach, or vomiting. People who inhale the reflux acid may experience coughing, hoarseness, or wheezing. Symptoms of GERD are generally worse after meals.

If you have had heartburn or any of the other symptoms for a while, you should see your doctor. You may want to visit an internist, a doctor who specializes in internal medicine, or a gastroenterologist, a doctor who treats diseases of the stomach and intestines. Depending on how severe your GERD is, treatment may involve lifestyle changes and medications or surgery.

Hernia 


Most hernias result from a weakness in the abdominal wall that either develops or that an infant is born with (congenital). Any increase in pressure in the abdomen, such as coughing, straining, heavy lifting, or pregnancy, can be a considered causative factor in developing an abdominal hernia. Obesity or recent excessive weight loss, as well as aging and previous surgery, are also risk factors.

Most abdominal hernias appear suddenly when the abdominal muscles are strained. The person may feel tenderness, a slight burning sensation, or a feeling of heaviness in the bulge. It may be possible for the person to push the hernia back into place with gentle pressure, or the hernia may disappear by itself when the person reclines. Being able to push the hernia back is called reducing it.

About 50% of all people with hiatal hernias do not have any symptoms. If symptoms exist they will include heartburn, usually 30-60 minutes following a meal. There may be some mid chest pain due to gastric acid from the stomach being pushed up into the esophagus. The pain and heartburn are usually worse when lying down. Frequent belching and feelings of abdominal fullness may also be present.

Once an abdominal hernia occurs it tends to increase in size. Some patients with abdominal hernias wait and watch for a while prior to choosing surgery. In these cases, they must avoid strenuous physical activity such as heavy lifting or straining with constipation. They may also wear a truss, which is a support worn like a belt to keep a small hernia from protruding. People can tell if their hernia is getting worse if they develop severe constant pain, nausea and vomiting, or if the bulge does not return to normal when lying down or when they try to gently push it back in place. In these cases they should consult with their doctor immediately. But, ultimately, surgery is the treatment in almost all cases.

Heartburn


Heartburn is due to the reflux or back flow of acid material from the stomach into the lower part of the oesophagus (gullet). This often follows a weakness in the valve or sphincter that controls the lower oesophagus.

It manifests as a burning sensation behind the breastbone in the chest - not abdomen.

The burning sensation is often worse after lying down in bed or at night and often leaves a sour taste in the back of the throat or mouth. It is a medical word that describes a range of conditions called Gastro-Oesophageal-Reflux-Disease (GORD).


Again, like indigestion, if you feel a pain in your central chest not going off within half an hour, do not assume it is heartburn. Endeavor to see your doctor as soon as possible.