5 Tips To Help You Avoid Asthma Attacks In Colder Weather

5 Tips To Help You Avoid Asthma Attacks In Colder Weather


Cold Weather with Asthma


Asthma symptoms are often made worse if you catch a cold or flu and we also see a marked increase in hospital admissions for asthma sufferers when the temperature goes down. However, if you take extra care and manage your asthma condition properly you should be able to withstand the rigours of the winter weather and the associated asthma symptoms and thus avoid a full-blown asthma attack.

5 Tips To Help You Avoid Asthma Attacks In Colder Weather


Make sure you visit your doctor or designated asthma nurse in your GP surgery and they will review your medication and make any necessary changes. This is known as a personal asthma action plan and contains important information to help you take control of your asthma, including details of your asthma medicines, key warning signs to tell you when your condition is getting worse, what to do about it and emergency procedure should you have an asthma attack. If you have not had a review in the last year, it is advisable to contact your doctor surgery and book an appointment as soon as possible.

The following are 5 tips to help you avoid asthma attacks in colder weather.

  •  Always use your regular prevention medicines as prescribed by your doctor, even if you do not feel you need it. Prevention medicines are designed to be used daily to prevent an attack.
  •  If you are already aware that the cold weather triggers your asthma it is a good idea to take 1 or 2 puffs of your reliever inhaler before going outside.
  •  Always make sure you have your reliever inhaler with you at all times.
  •  Wear a scarf over your nose and mouth when you go outside as it will help to warm up the cold air before you breathe it in.
  •  Be sure to warm up for at least 10 minutes before doing exercise outdoors in cold weather and it is a good idea to take 1 or 2 puffs of your reliever inhaler before you start exercising.
5 Tips To Help You Avoid Asthma Attacks In Colder Weather
Wear a scarf over your nose and mouth

If you having an asthma attack


If you notice that you are experiencing shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, feeling tightness in the chest and finding it difficult to speak, then you may be having an asthma attack. It is important to stay calm, sit down and try to take slow, steady breaths. Take 1 or 2 puffs from your reliever inhaler immediately.

When should you dial the emergency services?


If there is no improvement, continue taking 2 puffs of your reliever inhaler every 2 minutes. You should take up to 10 puffs. If your symptoms have not improved after 5 or 10 minutes and you have become too breathless to talk, you should call for emergency assistance. If you are worried about your attack at any time you should contact the emergency services. If an ambulance has not arrived after 15 minutes then take 1 or 2 puffs from your reliever inhaler while you are waiting.