Shingles: What are shingles virus symptoms

What are shingles virus symptoms


What is shingles virus


When the chickenpox virus reactivates, the virus moves down the long nerve fibers that extend from the sensory cell bodies to the skin. The viruses multiply, the telltale rash erupts, and the person now has herpes zoster, or shingles. With shingles, the nervous system is more deeply involved than it was during the bout with chickenpox, and the symptoms of shingles are often more complex and severe.

What are shingles virus symptoms


The first symptom of shingles virus  is usually one-sided pain, tingling, or burning. The pain and burning may be severe and is usually present before any rash appears.
Red patches on the skin, followed by small blisters, form in most people.
  • The blisters break, forming small sores that begin to dry and form crusts. The crusts fall off in 2 to 3 weeks. Scarring is rare.
  • The rash usually involves a narrow area from the spine around to the front of the belly area or chest.
  • The rash may involve the face, eyes, mouth, and ears.
Other symptoms may include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Fever and chills
  • General ill feeling
  • Genital sores
  • Headache
  • Joint pain
  • Swollen glands (lymph nodes)
You may also have pain, muscle weakness, and a rash involving different parts of your face if shingles affects a nerve in your face. The symptoms may include:
  • Difficulty moving some of the muscles in the face
  • Drooping eyelid (ptosis)
  • Hearing loss
  • Loss of eye motion
  • Taste problems
  • Vision problems