Maternal Omega 3 & B Vitamins Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Female Offspring

Maternal Omega 3 & B Vitamins Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Female Offspring


Maternal Omega 3 & B Vitamins Reduce Breast Cancer Risk


Researchers are now convinced that gene settings that occur in response to the nutritional status of a pregnant mother have a significant impact on her daughter’s risk for future breast cancer.

Two different researchers recently presented their study findings at the Era of Hope conference, a scientific meeting hosted by the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP).  The researchers presented information showing that an increased intake of omega 3 fatty acids (such as DHA) during pregnancy and an increased intake of B vitamins and other methyl donor nutrients (such as folic acid, B12, methionine and choline) created a more stable gene expression environment that helped protect against future breast cancer. These were mice studies that enabled the researchers to follow the impact of pregnancy nutrition to see which mice developed breast cancer. However, the data is highly relevant to humans and adds to other data pointing in the same direction.

“Pregnant women should be mindful of what they consume since their diet may incite epigenetic changes that could impact the development of their offspring, not just in utero but also for time to come,” said Dr. Philippe Georgel, Marshall University.

“This is exciting and intriguing research,” said Captain Melissa Kaime, M.D., Director of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP), under which the BCRP is managed. Kaime says, “To be able to reduce the risk and possibly prevent this devastating disease before birth is an incredible notion; the BCRP is proud to support research with such potential.”