Detection IVIG is not effective in the treatment of blood cancer in infants


Detection IVIG is not effective in the treatment of blood cancer in infants

In a study on a global scale, scientists working at the University of Sydney, Australia has concluded that: the use of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) in the treatment of sepsis in neonates is an expensive treatment and ineffective.

Bloodstream infections in newborns is a leading cause of death in infants.


Group of research scientists Immunotherapy Infants International (INIS), have investigated the use of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) in the treatment of sepsis in more than 3000 children from departments infant resuscitation on a global scale.

The results of this study have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, September 30, 2011.

In this study, the researchers concluded that: the rate of death or severe disability in infants septicemia disease is 39%, in cases of suspected or proven treatment used Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) - equal to the rate of death or severe disability in cases in which patients were treated with placebo.

Infants with low levels of antibodies against the infection, known as immunoglobulins. Previous research has suggested that: use of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) in the treatment of sepsis in newborns, a blood products derived from blood donors, can make halve the number of deaths in infants infected, according to Professor William Tarnow-Mordi, Director of the Experimental treatment of infants at clinical trial centers NHMRC University of Sydney, Australia and is Director Director of Research Center for Infant WINNER.

Detection IVIG is not effective in the treatment of blood cancer in infants


Professor Tarnow-Mordi, head of research at the Australian said: "While some health experts often recommend use of IVIG to treat infants with suspected bloodstream infections, others wait for the findings of the INIS researchers ".

Intravenous immune bangglobulin treatment (IVIG) is expensive and supplies are limited. This treatment method requires considerable time and effort to manage, with increased risk of fluid overload or risk of infectious disease transmission during child hospitalization.

'The results of the study help to confirm the doubts about the usefulness of the use of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) in the treatment of sepsis in neonates. Instead of using IVIG in neonates, we can spend precious resources for treatment for those patients more effectively. "

Associate Professor John Ziegler, Chairman of the NSW Health group using IVIG, said: "The members of the research team of scientists Immunotherapy Infants International (INIS) has achieved success large in this study. This helped to encourage other researchers to pursue research on the effectiveness and costs of the use of IVIG in the treatment of other diseases, where the role IVIG has not been confirmed. "

Professor Warwick Anderson, Chief Executive of the Medical Research Council and National Health, said: "Research Immunotherapy Infants International illustrates the importance of high-quality research brings Confidence in clinical trials in all age groups. "

More than 40% of infants in the trial were recruited in the department for newborn resuscitation in Australia or New Zealand, coordinated through the Clinical Trial Research Center Clinical Medical Research Council National Health and University of Sydney, Australia.

On a global scale, the test in collaboration with the Department of Epidemiology National reproductive cycle at the University of Oxford, United States, led by Professor Peter Brocklehurst.

This research is funded by: the Medical Research Council and the Australian National Health, with additional funding by the British Medical Research Council and the Health Research Council of New Zealand. Supply of IVIG in Australia is from blood reserves of the Australian Red Cross and funded by the Australian government.
Duy Binh (sydney.edu.au)